Episode 40: “Copyright Term Extension is a Tax on Consumers” - Paul Heald on What Extending Copyright Term Could Mean for Canada

October 28, 2021 00:38:53
Episode 40: “Copyright Term Extension is a Tax on Consumers” - Paul Heald on What Extending Copyright Term Could Mean for Canada
Law Bytes
Episode 40: “Copyright Term Extension is a Tax on Consumers” - Paul Heald on What Extending Copyright Term Could Mean for Canada

Oct 28 2021 | 00:38:53

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Show Notes

Copyright term extension has emerged as a major policy issue in Canada in recent months. Canada’s general copyright term is life of the author plus 50 years and successive governments have rejected lobbying pressure to extend by an additional 20 years. That changed with the new NAFTA, which includes a life plus 70 years requirement. Canada negotiated a 30 month transition period with no need to extend the copyright term during that time. The Canadian copyright review recommended that any extension include a registration requirement for the extra 20 years.

Paul Heald is a law professor at the University of Illinois, where he has led the world in conducting extensive empirical analysis on the effects of copyright term extension and the value of the public domain. His work has used some creative methods examining data on sites such as Amazon and Wikipedia to learn more about the effects of term extension. He joined me on the podcast to discuss his findings and new work he has been doing on the data in Canada.

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

How Copyright Keeps Works Disappeared
The Valuation of Unprotected Works: A Case Study of Public Domain Photographs on Wikipedia

Credits:

House of Commons, January 31, 2020

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