Episode 102: Colleen Flood on the Legal, Ethical and Policy Implications of Vaccine Passports

September 27, 2021 00:33:06
Episode 102: Colleen Flood on the Legal, Ethical and Policy Implications of Vaccine Passports
Law Bytes
Episode 102: Colleen Flood on the Legal, Ethical and Policy Implications of Vaccine Passports

Sep 27 2021 | 00:33:06

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Show Notes

Vaccine passports or certificates launched in Ontario last week, a development welcomed by some and strongly opposed by others. The launch raises a myriad of legal, ethical, privacy, and policy issues as jurisdictions around the world grapple with the continued global pandemic and the unusual requirements of demonstrating vaccination in order to enter some public or private spaces.

Professor Colleen Flood, a colleague at the University of Ottawa, has been writing and thinking about these issues for many months. Later today, she will be part of a panel discussion that explores the policy challenges hosted by the University of Ottawa Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics, and the Centre for Law, Technology and Society. She joins the Law Bytes podcast with an advance preview as we discuss the legal balancing act, models from around the world, and the concerns that governments should be thinking about in this next stage of dealing with COVID-19.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Vaccine Passports/Certificates: Law, Ethics & Policy

Wilson & Flood, Implementing Digital Passports for SARS-CoV-2 Immunization in Canada
Flood, Krishnamurthy, Wilson, Please Show Your Vaccination Certificate

Credits:

CityNews, Day One of Ontario’s Vaccine Passport

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