Episode 103: Privacy Reform Comes to Canada - Chantal Bernier on the Passage of Quebec's Bill 64

October 04, 2021 00:32:15
Episode 103: Privacy Reform Comes to Canada - Chantal Bernier on the Passage of Quebec's Bill 64
Law Bytes
Episode 103: Privacy Reform Comes to Canada - Chantal Bernier on the Passage of Quebec's Bill 64

Oct 04 2021 | 00:32:15

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Show Notes

Privacy reform in Canada has lagged at the federal level with the efforts to update PIPEDA seemingly going nowhere, but multiple provinces have moved ahead with amending their own laws. Quebec leads the way as late last month it quietly passed Bill 64, a major privacy reform package that reflects – and even goes beyond – many emerging international privacy law standards. Chantal Bernier, the former interim privacy commissioner of Canada, now leads the Dentons law firm’s Canadian Privacy and Cybersecurity practice group. She joins the Law Bytes podcast to talk about Bill 64, including its origins, key provisions, and implications for privacy law in Canada.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Bill 64 on Modernizing Quebec privacy law – Why It Matters and How to Prepare for It

Credits:

Canadian Press, Bains Explains Update to Canada’s Digital Privacy Law

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