Episode 136: Jeremy de Beer on SOCAN v. ESA, the Supreme Court's Latest Endorsement of Copyright Balance and Technological Neutrality

July 25, 2022 00:32:59
Episode 136: Jeremy de Beer on SOCAN v. ESA, the Supreme Court's Latest Endorsement of Copyright Balance and Technological Neutrality
Law Bytes
Episode 136: Jeremy de Beer on SOCAN v. ESA, the Supreme Court's Latest Endorsement of Copyright Balance and Technological Neutrality

Jul 25 2022 | 00:32:59

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Show Notes

The Supreme Court of Canada's latest copyright decision - SOCAN v. Entertainment Software Association - affirms yet again that technological neutrality is a foundational element of the law and notably emphasizes that “copyright law does not exist solely for the benefit of authors.” My colleague Jeremy de Beer was an active participant in the case, writing an expert opinion during the Copyright Board phase of the case which reflects the approach that the court ultimately adopted. He joins the Law Bytes podcast to discuss the evolution of music distribution online, this latest case and the court’s commitment to copyright balance, as well as what might come next in the seemingly never-ending battle over Canadian copyright law.

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