Episode 148: Christelle Tessono on Bringing a Human Rights Lens to AI Regulation in Bill C-27

November 28, 2022 00:26:16
Episode 148: Christelle Tessono on Bringing a Human Rights Lens to AI Regulation in Bill C-27
Law Bytes
Episode 148: Christelle Tessono on Bringing a Human Rights Lens to AI Regulation in Bill C-27

Nov 28 2022 | 00:26:16

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Show Notes

Bill C-27, the government’s privacy and artificial intelligence bill is slowly making its way through the Parliamentary process. One of the emerging issues has been the mounting opposition to the AI portion of the bill, including a recent NDP motion to divide the bill for voting purposes, separating the privacy and AI portions. In fact, several studies have been released which place the spotlight on the concerns with the government’s plan for AI regulation, which is widely viewed as vague and ineffective. Christelle Tessono is a tech policy researcher based at Princeton University's Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP). She was one of several authors of a joint report on the AI bill which brought together researchers from the Cybersecure Policy Exchange at Toronto Metropolitan University, McGill University’s Centre for Media, Technology and Democracy, and the Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton University. Christelle joins the Law Bytes podcast to talk about the report and what she thinks needs to change in Bill C-27.

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