Episode 150: How Will Canada Regulate News and Streaming - My Appearance on TVO’s The Agenda

December 12, 2022 00:16:45
Episode 150: How Will Canada Regulate News and Streaming - My Appearance on TVO’s The Agenda
Law Bytes
Episode 150: How Will Canada Regulate News and Streaming - My Appearance on TVO’s The Agenda

Dec 12 2022 | 00:16:45

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Show Notes

The government’s two big Internet bills - Bill C-11 and Bill C-18, both made significant advances late last week. The Senate Transport and Communications committee concluded months of hearings on Bill C-11 by agreeing to about 25 amendments, notably including a change to the scope of user content regulation that is designed to limit the application to sound recordings as well as the removal of a provision that critics feared would limit CRTC independence. Meanwhile in the House, Bill C-18 cleared the Canadian Heritage committee with changes that invite legal challenges and make a showdown over blocking news content increasingly likely. Just prior to these closing committee meetings, I appeared on TVO’s the Agenda with Steve Paikin to discuss the bills and why they matter. The interview elicited very positive feedback and with the kind permission of TVO and the Agenda, I’m pleased to provide the audio version of that interview as this week’s Law Bytes podcast.

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