Episode 151: The Year in Canadian Digital Law and Policy and What Lies Ahead in 2023

December 19, 2022 00:23:21
Episode 151: The Year in Canadian Digital Law and Policy and What Lies Ahead in 2023
Law Bytes
Episode 151: The Year in Canadian Digital Law and Policy and What Lies Ahead in 2023

Dec 19 2022 | 00:23:21

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Show Notes

Canadian digital law and policy in 2022 was marked by legislative battles over Bills C-11 and C-18, the Rogers outage, stalled privacy and AI reform, copyright term extension, and a growing trade battle with the U.S. over Canadian policies. For this final Law Bytes podcast of 2022, I go solo without a guest to talk about the most significant trends and developments in Canadian digital policy from the past year and to think a bit about what may lie ahead in 2023. 

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